If you’ve sent your third email over the space of a month and still haven’t received any response, it’s time to pick up the phone.

That might seem really daunting and nerve-wracking but remember, as the 30th US president, Calvin Coolige once said,

“Nothing in this world can take the place of persistence. Nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent”.

It’s highly unusual for any hard-working person to look down on someone who chases what they want. If anything it will impress them.

Here is a simple guide for ringing companies or that one company you’d love to work for, on asking if they’re hiring;

1. Do your research: Make sure you know what’s going on with whatever company you call. Not only does it save you from the embarrassment of being caught out and not knowing the obvious, but it also makes you look good.  For example, if the conversation progresses, “I saw from your website that you have (x) happening at the moment, how is that going?”

2. Have a script: This doesn’t need to be read to the person verbatim but write down the 2 or 3 points or questions that you definitely want to make/ask. It’s very annoying when you come off the phone saying “I should have said that”. Have an introduction of who you are and what it is exactly you want to ask, for example- “My name is John Murphy, I’m a TV producer. I have always been keen to find out more about your company/ I’d love to send you my cv, are you hiring?/ Are you guys busy at the moment?”

3. Speak to the right person: Don’t just speak to anyone- find out who the best person to speak to is regarding jobs. If that person is “in a meeting” either ask if it’s possible to get their direct email or call them back later.

4. Empathy: If they cut you off and say “no we’re not hiring” ensure to explain how much you understand and come off the phone having made them feel good about themselves, not worse for having to explain that they can’t hire at the moment. Remember- we are in times of COVID so be compassionate and empathetic. Make it clear that you understand how difficult and unusual these times are but don’t be afraid to ask if there’s a better time to make contact or will they be hiring in the near future, for example. They’ll remember you for not only being confident enough to call but as being friendly and polite too.

5. Stay in touch: There’s no harm in a follow-up email or phone call. You’ll know the people who appreciate persistence and those who don’t. Perhaps the ones who don’t aren’t the ones you want to work for.